Pandora is on a Mission to Make Diamond Jewelry Accessible

Ahead of the holiday season, Pandora builds on its existing lab-grown diamond jewelry, debuting a trio of new collections that combine high-quality craftsmanship with environmentally-conscious design.

In an effort to “democratize” diamonds through ethical means, the latest jewelry pieces feature lab-grown stones with the same color, cut, clarity and carat as their mined counterparts, making them more affordable whilst also having a lower carbon footprint. Crafted using 100% renewable energy with 100% recycled silver and gold, Pandora presents three distinctive designs that shape the individual collections, named Nova, Era and Talisman.

Pandora Nova aims to showcase the unending sparkle of lab-grown diamonds. With each piece taking on a four-prong setting, the round and princess-cut stones are able to capture and refract surrounding light from each angle. This design is replicated in chains, studs and a 14 carat gold ring. Whilst Nova takes on a contemporary look, the Pandora Era collection subscribes to a classic feel featuring a minimalistic bezel setting. An understated array of single drop pendants as well as three-set stones arrive in a mix of 14 carat white gold and yellow gold.

Making a statement amongst the line-up is the Pandora Talisman collection. Comprised of five pendant designs – including a heart, star, moon and horseshoe – the respective pieces bring a luxurious take on Pandora charms with a touch of individuality running through each piece. The pendants come with matching chains or can be bought individually, allowing wearers to mix and match on bracelets or necklaces.

The new collection makes its debut in the brand’s latest campaign titled “Diamonds for All.” Exploring the way lab-grown diamonds break traditions through all-round wearability, the campaign sees Pamela Anderson, Justina Miles and other public figures share how these jewelry pieces bring elegance as well as

Read the rest

Consumer Report: Lab-Grown Diamonds

The market for lab-grown diamonds is exploding this wedding season, putting larger gems onto more hands than ever.

But some say that shine can wear off when the synthetic stones quickly lose their value.

Pandora, the largest jeweler in the world, is now very much in the diamond business.

Last year, the company that’s well-known for its accessible charm bracelets began selling lab-grown diamonds set in rings and other jewelry.

The diamonds are offered at prices Pandora says make sense for their slice of the jewelry market.

“What we are seeing a lot is people that always dreamed but never had a chance to buy a diamond. Now they can,” said Luciano Rodembusch, Pandora’s North American President.

At Pandora, a one carat diamond ring goes for less than $2,000, while a 2-carat piece sells for roughly $5,000, a fraction of what similar, mined stones would cost.

Pandora says its lab-created diamonds are manufactured in U.S. facility using 100% renewable energy.

“Ours are going to be one-fifth to one-seventh of the price,” Rodembusch said.

According to The Knot, the popularity of lab-grown diamonds has doubled since 2020.

In 2022, more than a third of engagement ring center stones were manufactured, not mined.

Regardless of the source, the diamonds are visually and chemically the same.

But, some argue that there is a key value difference.

Olivia Landau, co-founder and CEO of custom jewelry company The Clear Cut, sells only natural diamonds, which she says hold or even increase in monetary value.

“Lab grown diamonds hold zero value. They’re mass produced. You can create an endless supply of them,” Landau said. “They’re kind of the fast-fashion of diamonds, whereas natural diamonds do hold inherent value.”

The Clear Cut does use lab-grown diamonds but it actually gives them away for free,

Read the rest